How to Choose a Hybrid Chef’s Knife

How to Choose a Hybrid Chef’s Knife

In Europe, the chef’s knife is a sturdy tool that can chop and slice anything. In Japan it’s a thin, light precision instrument. What happens when East meets West? Lisa McManus found out.

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20 Responses to How to Choose a Hybrid Chef’s Knife

  1. andrewt248 says:

    I just can't get past the look of the Victorinox. It looks like a toy. Just sayin.

  2. Chef Jacob Kh. says:

    i think the miyabi is very good also, the victorinox they dull pretty fast not quite thin so i will not say the victorianox comes 3 :/ , although its not highly priced . there is a difference in handles also between them wich is a personal thing . i think you should put all the knives in categories (sharpness, price , handle , maintenance .. etc) . i used victorianox for 10 yeas and still do usual give to beginners, also use kasumi dick wusthof miyabi , each is good in its task .

  3. Scott Fleming says:

    Very Informative and useful, thank you

  4. alex44996 says:

    victorinox knife seems to dull frustratingly quickly.  for a neat one-knife home kitchen solution the wusthof classic chai dao is tough to beat.  easy to maintain, holds an edge, blade big enough for big chefs knife tasks yet small enough that you dont mind getting it out for small tasks (same cant always be said for big chefs knives)

  5. BarcelonaCobayo1998 says:

    Maseratis suck

  6. VicariousReality7 says:

    Drop points

  7. droan999 says:

    How bout the test when the new dishwasher grabs ur knife off the counter to cut a busted corner on a dish rack? Or how bout when the serves need a bread knife and take ur chef knife and cuts limes on the slate bar? These tests and others need to be included 

  8. Geraldina Franco says:

    Outstanding reviews that we can count on.  Thank you and God bless.

  9. Richard Blaine says:

    European chefs knives and Japanese chefs knives are not "curved"! Not all "Hybrid" chefs knives get a 30 degree inclusive 15 degree on each side unless they are being made in what is called a "Symetrical" grind. The other type of grind that the "Hybrid" Japanese knives will get is called "Asymetrical" in which there are two different angles all together and require a slightly different method of sharpening! BTW The Victorinox Forschner you mention at .40 seconds is just a Victorinox as they are both the same company. One line is made in Switzerland and the other in Germany, The European knives will in most cases always stay sharper longer than the Japanese knives because of the thicker edge but man o man the Japanese knives cut so  much better!

  10. Ted Mader says:

    0:19 Slicing paper = typical kitchen task?

  11. MariaRus.USA says:

    THanks)

  12. Paolos Nasser says:

    Here's a list of the winners:

    1st Place: Masamoto VG Series Gyuto ($160-$230)
    Runner-up: Misono UX10 Series Gyuto ($200-$300)
    3rd Place: Victorinox Fibrox Chef's Knife ($40-$50)

    All are available from "chefknivestogo" dot com.

  13. B Matza says:

    About the Masamotos, they are not made from VG-10 steel, it's just the name of the series. Also, they do not have 50/50 bevels as she mentioned, they are 80/20 bevels for right hand users. Just something to know when sharpening.

  14. Rev.leyva says:

    She said Masamoto VG-10 Chef's Knife, and MISONO UX-10 CHEF'S KNIFE, Victorinox Forschner.

  15. MariaRus.USA says:

    Could you please list the winners in the description bar or say it clearly. It is often hard to hear the names of the brands.

  16. john shailer says:

    2nd try most knife owners do not know how to take care of kitchen knives: never put them in a dishwasher or drawer…always hand wash & dry and put them in a rack (one that will not allow the edge to contact the sharpened edge) You might come out with the differences between an edge that you mentioned, a hunting knife, and a filet knife (the bevels) PLUS always use throwaway serrated knives when used on ceramic plates

  17. Laszlo Mezei says:

    Great presentation!

  18. Andre P says:

    Can I just say that your reviews are the best reviews of anything I have seen on the internet. Researched, succinct, relevant and well presented.

    BRAVO!!

  19. JogBird says:

    how much is an ounze

  20. oterenceo says:

    Ceramic knives are used when we prepare raw sushi or when we want to cut acidic fruits. We don't want our cuts to come with the metallic taste. Thus we use ceramic. I use the kyocera ceramic knives. You can request American test kitchen to do a test to see which one has the best value for money.

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